Upcoming free webinar on project-based learning and distance education. The webinar is inside Adobe Connect, so be sure to do the pre-configuration below. Hat tip to Inge de Waard for letting me know about this:

Iain Doherty will discuss the pedagogical principles underlying a taught postgraduate distance course, ClinED 711 eLearning and Clinical Education. The aim of ClinED 711 is to teach clinical educators the necessary knowledge and skills to convert their own courses for flexible and distance delivery. ClinED 711 was designed to offer a personalized and authentic learning experience and Iain’s presentation will focus on how these aims were progressively realized through refining and improving the course design for ClinED 711. Whilst ClinED 711 is a specialized postgraduate course, the principles for the design and delivery of the course should be of interest to a wide audience.

When: Wednesday, September 7, 2011, 11am-12pm Mountain Time (Canada) *Local times for the CIDER sessions are provided on the CIDER website.

Where: The CIDER sessions have moved to Adobe Connect! To join this session go to: https://connect.athabascau.ca/cider/

Pre-Configuration:

Please note that it is extremely important that you get your system set up prior to the start of the event. Make sure your Mac or PC is equipped with a microphone and speakers, so that you can use the audio functionality built into the web conferencing software. Also, the Adobe Connect platform may require an update to your Adobe Flash Player. Allow time for this update by joining the session 20 minutes prior to the scheduled presentation start time.

via @Ignatia Webs: CIDER free online session on project based learning for postgraduate distance education.

Students from Rhodes Park Secondary School, Za...

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I’m excited to announce that I have new research being published in the the September issue of the Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-based Learning. This article presents the findings of students’ perspectives with project-based learning, conducted with 8th graders studying geography.  This is a follow-up to some of my previous writing and research on project-based learning.  (See for example, “Getting a grip…” , “Project-based learning in a middle school” , and a brief at the Buck Institute for Education.)

Below is a brief abstract of the findings, and I will give you an update when it comes out.

Project-based learning offers promise as an instructional method that affords authentic learning tasks grounded in the personal interests of learners.  While previous research has presented results of learning gains, motivations, and teacher experiences, limited empirical research has presented student perspectives in project-based learning.  This research sought to explore how learners created projects. A qualitative case study design was employed with five purposively selected participants from eighth grade geography at a private day school. From interviews, observations, and document collection, five themes emerged from what influenced participants’ projects and what the participants learned:  (1) internal influences, (2) external influences, (3) beliefs about projects, (4) tools for technology-rich environments, and (5) learning outcomes and products.  The first four themes describe influences to shape the fifth theme, learning products.  The term learning products was used to describe both the learning acquired by the participants and the learning artifacts the participants produced as part of the instructional unit.

If you have any questions, let me know in the comments below, or if you’d like to have a preprint version of the paper, I can probably swing that, too. 😉

In the past week, I’ve had two really nice (and fun) things happen to me professionally, and I wanted to share them with you guys, too.

MOBL21 Interview

First, the super-engaging folks at MOBL21 conducted an interview with me on how I’ve been doing mobile learning and mobile learning research over the past year or so.  It was a fun interview, and it was a fun opportunity to reflect on the work we’ve been doing here in Memphis on mobile learning. In particular, it was nice to consider the different presentations, research, and blog posts we’ve been working on, as well as all the great people I’ve had the change to talk to about mobile teaching and learning.

You can find the interview on MOBL21’s site at http://www.mobl21.com/blog/17/mobl21-interviews-mobile-learning%E2%80%93university-perspective/

Buck Institute for Education Highlight

Also, a good colleage/friend of mine at the Buck Institute for Education (BIE), Jason Ravitz, ask me about highlighting some research I conducted on project-based learning on their site.  This research represents a students perspective for project-based learning, which is often not reported on. You can find full research article and citation on their site at http://www.bie.org/research/study/students_perspective

A quick summary of the article says:

This article shares the perspective of five students who completed an 8th grade geography project that focused on investigating civil rights issues around the world. Based on what students said about their experiences, engagement in projects is shaped by a combination of

  • internal influences that motivate students,
  • external influences they perceive,
  • prior experiences and beliefs about projects, and
  • reliance on technologies.

These are my Jumptags for April 19th through April 20th:

These are my Jumptags for March 17th through April 13th:

These are my Jumptags for January 31st through February 9th:

These are my Jumptags for January 20th through January 21st:

I’ve had a really great time here at TETC in Nashville.  The sessions on Wednesday went great.  The feedback I received was really positive, and I hope the information was helpful to many of the teachers.  Today, we’re going to be discussing two topics.  The links and topics are below.

W84-The Secrets to Project-based Learning (2:45 – 3:45pm, Ballroom C)

Here is the link to web page with the details about PBL all in one place. I plan to be adding some more pieces here, too, so let me know if you think something is missing.

  1. Secrets to Project-based Learning

Web 2.0 … from the beginning

Here’s the link to the page that contains details about the presentations

  1. Web 2 from the beginning

Wow! I’m so excited to be in Nashville at the Tennessee Educational Technology Conference.  It’s been a few years since I’ve been back to TETC, but I’m ready to meet and share with some great teachers, administrators, and technology coordinators/coaches from across Tennessee.

I’ll presenting two sessions today: one on managing communications in online courses and one on project-based learning.  All of my resources and links are linked up below to make them easy to get to.  Please let me know if you have any questions.

W63-Tips for Managing Communications in Online Courses (1:30 – 2:30pm, Ballroom C)

Here are the links to the web pages with details for all of the topics we’ll discuss:

  1. Tips for Online Course Management
  2. Tips for Asynchronous Communications
  3. Tips for Synchronous Communications

W84-The Secrets to Project-based Learning (2:45 – 3:45pm, Ballroom C)

Here is the link to web page with the details about PBL all in one place.  I plan to be adding some more pieces here, too, so let me know if you think something is missing.

  1. Secrets to Project-based Learning

I’m at the American Educational Research Association annual meeting this week in San Diego, CA.  I’m presenting three session throughout the week, which is a little tough to get through.  On Tuesday, I presented on “Coming to Understand the Influences on and Artifacts of Learning.”  Today, I’m presenting “Understanding Projects in Project-based Learning: A Student’s Perspective.”  The abstract reads:

Project-based learning offers promise as an instructional method that affords authentic learning tasks grounded in the personal interests of learners.  While previous research has presented results of learning gains, motivations and teacher experiences, still limited empirical research has presented the student perspective in project-based learning.  This research sought to explore how learners created projects. Using a case study design and five purposively selected participants from eighth grade geography, five themes emerged:  (1) internal influences, (2) external influences, (3) beliefs about projects, (4) tools for technology-rich environments, and (5) learning outcomes and products.  The first four themes describe influences to shape the fifth theme, learning products.  The term learning products was used to describe both the learning garnered by the participants and the learning artifacts the participants produced as part of the instructional unit.  Implications for practice and future research are considered.

You can download the complete file here.

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