google conference on air

While it has been publicized pretty widely, I wanted to make sure you remembered that May 2nd (next week) is when Google’s Education On Air conference is happening.  This is completely online and free professional development for inservice and preservice teachers.  So, I highly encourage you to attend what you can.

Another bonus is that the sessions are being offered by everyday folks, like you and me.  You can see in the presenters list that there are folks from around the world who will be presenting on a wide variety of topics all day long. There are very tech-y things, like setting up Google Apps for your domain to very concrete pedagogical things with Google Apps, such as Google Docs for writing instructors (this is one I think I’m going to try and make).

Google even has the sessions set up to add directly into your Gcal, so you won’t miss a thing!  If you attend a session next week, let me know.  If you take notes or you’re tweeting, let me know, too.  I’d like to add your thoughts in here.

via EducationOnAir.

You may remember a couple of weeks ago I started a series of posts on strategies I have been using for mobile learning (#mlearning) and teaching in one of my graduate instructional technology courses.  In the first post, I described the use of Remind101.com and how I had used it with my students as both a messaging service for reminders, as well as a method to send “activities” to students where I wanted them to think and capture ideas during the course of their day.

Google Voice

Image representing Google Voice as depicted in...

Image via CrunchBase

Another technology and strategy that I used in my course was Google Voice.  Google Voice is a free telephone service and also includes voice recording and messaging. Google reports that it will continue be free through 2012.

I used Mr. Lobdell’s VoCall Youtube video as a model integrating Google Voice for mobile learning.  You can see his video commercial below.  (I use this video as a great example in many of my workshops with mobile learning and teaching.)

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7PoWsFlsKU[/youtube]

Because my course’s topic was mobile learning, I asked to students to call into my Google Voice number and define “mobile learning” in their own words for me.  Because we had been working on this topic over the course of the entire unit, I wanted to capture their ideas and explanations about mobile learning, and I believed Google Voice was a great — and extremely easy — way to accomplish this.  In the examples below, you can see Google Voice’s transcriptions of the students’ audio files.

(I find that iPadio does a much better job at the transcription than Google Voice, but I find Google Voice very easy to use without a passcode for students to enter. Don’t get me wrong. I really, really like the utility of iPadio, and it is a great, easy option for capturing podcasts and vodcasts.  See this post for using iPadio.)

One of the features in Google Voice that I find extremely useful is the option to embed the Google Voice recording.  Under the more menu at the bottom of each Google Voice recording, you can choose to Embed (or download if you wish) the audio file.

I used the embed code I received here in Google Voice to repost the audio files into our course management system’s discussion board, so other students could listen to the definitions of their classmates. Google Voice provides a nice, little audio player for students to click on and listen.

While I don’t think I used this technique was used to its fullest potential, I like the notion here of the sharing and allowing students to hear other students’ ideas.  This was the first time I had done this, and next time I think I will do a much better job of coordinating this and leveraging it for learning.  Because this entire unit was new, I was trying not to make activities as complex as possible.  So, I took on the burden of posting the audio files.  Next time I may ask students to use iPadio and embed the files themselves into the discussion board.

And You?

Have you been using Google Voice either for your professional productivity or in your classes?  I would definitely like to hear how you’re using it with students if you have those examples.  I would really like to share these in my classes and with other teachers and faculty members when they ask for examples.

4 Strategies for Mobile Learning & Teaching Series

  1. Part 1: Remind101.com
  2. Part 2: Google Voice
  3. Part 3: Posterous (coming up)
  4. Part 4: eBook (coming up)
SAN FRANCISCO - MARCH 02:  An attendee holds t...

Image by Getty Images via @daylife

This morning I have the pleasure of presenting with a good friend of mine, Dr. Joanne Gikas, at AECT 2011 in Jacksonville, FL.  We will be presenting on strategies for mobile teaching and learning.  Along with some of the fun tips, tricks, and tools I often talk about, such as iPadio, Google Voice, and Posterous Spaces, we will also be demo-ing some cool new gadgets, such as AppleTV, the Cars2 AppMATes, and Duo Pop for iPad.  These are sure to be fun for everybody.

If you would like to see the slides, here they are:

[slideshare id=10082328&doc=slideshare-temp-111108221644-phpapp02]

 

These are my Jumptags for December 9th through December 10th:

These are my Jumptags for December 7th through December 9th:

These are my Jumptags for November 18th

These are my Jumptags for November 12th

Union University logoI’m so excited to go back to Union University today.  Dr. Anna Clifford and her students invite me from time to time to come and spend some time with them talking about Google and Web 2.0.  We always have so much fun.  (Anna always remembers that M&Ms are my favorite treats, too.)  Today, I have the pleasure of Joanne G. coming with me to share her expertise as well.  She’s a former middle school teacher with Memphis City Schools and has a wealth of real-world knowledge that can be sure with Anna’s preservice teachers.  I don’t know if we’ll get everything that we want to talk about in or not, though.

Today, we’re going to tooling around with Google Docs/Apps.  In particular, we’re going to take a look at Google Reader, Google Docs word processor, Google Docs presentations, Google Docs spreadsheets and Google Docs forms.

Here’s the links to the wiki pages I’ve created to go along with the workshop.  Anything we don’t get to will be accessible through these links, and please use them liberally.

  1. Using Google Reader
  2. Using Google Docs word processor
  3. Using Google Docs presentations
  4. Using Google Docs spreadsheet
  5. Creating forms and quizzes with Google Docs forms

And a Google Form for us to try if we have time.

Union University logoIt’s going to be a great Saturday morning! I get to spend the morning with some awesome teachers at Union University in Jackson, TN. So, “Good morning, Union!” or maybe it should be, “Google morning, Union!”  They are taking a weekend class with my dear friend Dr. Anna Clifford, and she asks me from time to time to come spend some time playing with them. I’m so honored that I get to come.  I love sharing and I get to learn something, too.

Today, we’re going to tooling around with Google Docs/Apps.  In particular, we’re going to take a look at Google Reader, Google Docs word processor, Google Docs presentations, Google Docs spreadsheets and Google Docs forms.  I hope we can get through it all.

If we don’t happen to make it through everything (and that’s okay, I always plan too much), here’s the links to the wiki pages I’ve created to go along with the workshop.  Anything we don’t get to will be accessible through these links, and please use them liberally.

  1. Using Google Reader
  2. Using Google Docs word processor
  3. Using Google Docs presentations
  4. Using Google Docs spreadsheet
  5. Creating forms and quizzes with Google Docs forms

And a Google Form for us to try.

These are my Jumptags for August 16th through August 21st: