Last week, I wrote about the improved/updated version of Google Docs presentations that is available now for interested individuals. Google Docs is, of course, a great alternative to Microsoft Office.  I know that some schools have considered Google Docs specifically as a financial release to Microsoft Office.

But I have found it to be a great companion to Microsoft Office, too.  For me, this has been particularly true with collaboration among colleagues and students.  For example, a couple of weeks ago , our students, alumni, and I presented at the Midsouth Technology Conference here in town.  A couple of the presentations required input from up to 8 or so folks, such as the “60 Apps in 60 minutes” presentation.  In preparing our presentations, the students and alumni were able to contribute to the presentation individual slides, and the slides stayed in one place.  Then at the end, I downloaded the slides to Microsoft Powerpoint — just in case the network was questionable at the site.  I do find it super helpful to create slides with directions on them for students about how to contribute to the presentation.  For example in this presentation, I asked students to duplicate my template (and how to do that). I also suggested how they should prepare each slide with a screen shot.

In another presentations for “How Schools Are Doing Mobile,” I provided some scaffolding for novice researchers who would be presenting to practitioners and how I thought we should structure the presentation in order to be most audience-centered.  (I also provided some tips on how to craft a meaningful presentation, too.)

As I mentioned in my post about the updated Google Docs presentations, I found that the updated Google Docs translated/exported to Microsoft Powerpoint better than before.  So, the slides for “How Schools Are Doing Mobile” from inside Google Docs presentations (like the slide just above) were easily converted to another Powerpoint template to make them “prettier,” like below.

Are you finding that Google Docs is working as a companion to Microsoft Office or in competition?  What other examples can you share of either way?  Also, are there other tools that you’re using either as a companion to Microsoft Office or as a replacement?

Slideshare iconSince I’ve been uploading quite a few presentations this semester from my Developing Interactive Learning Environments and project management course, I’ve also decided to upload a few others to Slideshare.net that I’ve given and created recently.  This is a little slow going, because I am attempting to be critical and meticulous to copyrights, as well as respectful of ideas and images, giving credit where appropriate.  I’m also systematically adding my Creative Commons licensing to each of the slide decks.

Last fall, I was invited to present to Dr. Sally Blake’s graduate student seminar about using technology to support your research.  So, I’m including those slides below.  These slides are organized into the phases of research:

  1. awareness of a field of endeavor
  2. literature searches and reviews
  3. citation management
  4. data collection
  5. data analysis
  6. dissemination

Just a sample of the technologies that are mentioned include journal table of contents updates, Delicious, diigo, LinkedIn, Mendeley, EndNote, RefWorks, SPSS, Google Docs Forms, SurveyMonkey, Nvivo, and Atlas.ti.  Here are the slides:

[slideshare id=3456284&doc=research-with-tech-100317094659-phpapp02]

Let me know if you have questions or suggestions for other technologies that I can include in the future, particularly ones that you use.

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Today, I get to spend the day at Union University with Dr. Anna Clifford’s classes. Anna is always so generous and invites me to come visit with her students and share a little of my knowledge with them. For the past few times, we’ve been concentrating on Google Docs. But I think I’m going to throw in a little Wordle this time, too.

Below are the links and resources we’ll be using from my Resource Wiki hosted at PBWorks.

  1. Using Google Docs word processor
  2. Using Google Docs presentations
  3. Using Google Docs spreadsheet
  4. Creating forms and quizzes with Google Docs forms

And hopefully, we’ll have time to do a little Wordle, too, to see how we might use Wordle during class.

These are my Jumptags for November 16th

These are my Jumptags for November 12th

Union University logoI’m so excited to go back to Union University today.  Dr. Anna Clifford and her students invite me from time to time to come and spend some time with them talking about Google and Web 2.0.  We always have so much fun.  (Anna always remembers that M&Ms are my favorite treats, too.)  Today, I have the pleasure of Joanne G. coming with me to share her expertise as well.  She’s a former middle school teacher with Memphis City Schools and has a wealth of real-world knowledge that can be sure with Anna’s preservice teachers.  I don’t know if we’ll get everything that we want to talk about in or not, though.

Today, we’re going to tooling around with Google Docs/Apps.  In particular, we’re going to take a look at Google Reader, Google Docs word processor, Google Docs presentations, Google Docs spreadsheets and Google Docs forms.

Here’s the links to the wiki pages I’ve created to go along with the workshop.  Anything we don’t get to will be accessible through these links, and please use them liberally.

  1. Using Google Reader
  2. Using Google Docs word processor
  3. Using Google Docs presentations
  4. Using Google Docs spreadsheet
  5. Creating forms and quizzes with Google Docs forms

And a Google Form for us to try if we have time.

These are my Jumptags for October 8th through October 9th:

Union University logoIt’s going to be a great Saturday morning! I get to spend the morning with some awesome teachers at Union University in Jackson, TN. So, “Good morning, Union!” or maybe it should be, “Google morning, Union!”  They are taking a weekend class with my dear friend Dr. Anna Clifford, and she asks me from time to time to come spend some time playing with them. I’m so honored that I get to come.  I love sharing and I get to learn something, too.

Today, we’re going to tooling around with Google Docs/Apps.  In particular, we’re going to take a look at Google Reader, Google Docs word processor, Google Docs presentations, Google Docs spreadsheets and Google Docs forms.  I hope we can get through it all.

If we don’t happen to make it through everything (and that’s okay, I always plan too much), here’s the links to the wiki pages I’ve created to go along with the workshop.  Anything we don’t get to will be accessible through these links, and please use them liberally.

  1. Using Google Reader
  2. Using Google Docs word processor
  3. Using Google Docs presentations
  4. Using Google Docs spreadsheet
  5. Creating forms and quizzes with Google Docs forms

And a Google Form for us to try.

These are my Jumptags for September 24th through September 29th: