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Creative Commons License Photo Credit: MD. Hasibul Haque Sakib via Compfight

I came across this blog post in my Zite feeds yesterday, and I thought that I should really share this for how timely it is to some of my students.  Right now, my doctoral class in academic writing is in the process of writing drafts of their literature reviews. So, I thought they might like a little support or scaffolding to help them write better (or stimulate their writing).

I know that students sometimes struggle with how to “say things” in their writing.  What I like about this post is that is organizes the different types of statements/arguments that you may make.  For example, here is a section under the “Argue” heading.

Argue

  1. Along similar lines, [X] argues that ___.
  2. There seems to be no compelling reason to argue that ___.
  3. As a rebuttal to this point, it might be (convincingly) argued that ___.
  4. There are [three] main arguments that can be advanced to support ___.
  5. The underlying argument in favor of / against [X] is that ___.
  6. [X]‘s argument in favor of / against [Y] runs as follows: ___.

via 70 useful sentences for academic writing.

Another Resource

Another resource that I use in my writing class is provided by UC Davis, and it has some excellent tips for academic writing, particularly with ways/methods to say things and verb tenses.

This notice is from Dr. Zeni Colorado and the turnaround is rather quick:

AECT’s Research and Theory Division is excited to announce the call for participants for the 2012 Early Career Symposium sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

We are looking for Nine Early Career Faculty and Nine Advanced Graduate Students to participate! For more information and to apply, please go to http://bit.ly/Q8tdAS . Due to the late notification of funding, we are on a tight timeline for application and application review. All application materials must be submitted no later than 12pm Eastern time, September 15th, 2012.

Louisville Convention : NSF Career Symposium

http://aectorg.yourwebhosting.com/events/mentor/CareerSymposium.asp?clientid=25506

The AECT Faculty/Student Mentor program has merged with the Early Career Symposium! AECT’s Research and Theory Division is proud to announce the call for participants for the 2012 AECT Early Career Symposium sponsored by the National Science Foundation. The symposium will be held at the annual AECT International Convention on October 30-31, 2012, in Louisville, Kentucky. The symposium will engage participants in a day and a half of focused career mentoring and networking.
Jean Piaget

Jean Piaget. Image by mirjoran via Flickr

I often share with doctoral students that there definitely distinct stages (similar to Piaget‘s stage theory) of a doctoral program. I often liken them to drowning and treading water at the beginning with a desire to stop learning what others are teaching at the end. 😉 I was pleased to see that today on Slideshare, there was a one-page synopsis of research on these stages, so I thought I would share this with a lot of my current and former students and you guys/gals can let me know if this is true or not.  Thanks to Carol Haigh for sharing this.

Image representing Diigo as depicted in CrunchBase

Image via CrunchBase

This semester I am teaching a new course for doctoral students called IDT 8600: Seminar in IDT Research.  This course is targeted, though, at students from across curriculum and instruction.  (Currently, this course is closed and password protected. But if you’d like to take a peek, let me know.  I’ll see what I can do.)

The purpose of the course is three-fold:

  1. Students will read and critique educational research.
  2. Students will explore educational research with faculty members and advanced students.
  3. Students will conduct educational research collaboratively.
Image representing Mendeley as depicted in Cru...

Image via CrunchBase

To facilitate all three of these goals, I have created a new Diigo group for students to share bookmarks.  You can join the group (it’s open to anyone) at http://groups.diigo.com/group/doctoral-students. We will also be using Mendeley to share references as we collaboratively conduct research.

 

In addition to the collaborative research we will be conducting about mobile teaching and learning, faculty members from across our department of curriculum and instruction will pop in to share their research interests and how students can engage in research.  And to get a “voice from the experts,” I’ve asked some students to come in and share their experiences as novice researchers.  I’m really looking forward to the experience.

Ole Miss Rebels Logo.

Image via Wikipedia

The Midsouth Educational Research Association (MSERA) will be holding its annual meeting in Oxford, MS, this year at the University of Mississippi. The dates are November 2-4, 2011, and the conference hotel is The Inn at Ole Miss.

This is an excellent opportunity for graduate students to share their educational research. The Call for Papers describes the requirements for the conference, and the deadline for proposal submissions is July 15. MSERA has a special type of presentation specifically for graduate students, who may have research in progress (RIP). From the MSERA website, they describe the RIP sessions:

These sessions are reserved for graduate students who are not yet finished with their research studies. Each participant will make a 10-13 minute presentation. A general discussion will follow the presentation. Papers must describe research or the plan/literature review on which the student is currently working. Papers may be one of two types:

  • research, evaluation, or program results
  • reviews of the literature.

An abstract for a Research in Progress session should include as much of the following that the student currently has. Not all elements are needed to submit for these sessions:

  • a statement of the problem
  • a brief description of the research that provides the theoretical grounding for the problem
  • a summary of the methods which includes a description of data collection, instrumentation, analysis, and subjects
  • results, and
  • conclusions/implications of the study.

Once a student’s presentation has been provisionally accepted, the student will be required to submit their contact/affiliation information and a letter of support to the RIP reviewers in order to receive any available funding and to be scheduled for the conference.

To make reservations for the conference hotel, you can reserve online or with the phone number below:

  • Room rates: $104 (single/double)
  • Reservations (888) 486-7666 (be sure to mention MSERA meeting when making reservations)

 

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I just wanted to let you know about two graduate courses I will be teaching this summer.  Both are during the first summer term (June 4 – July 6, 2011).  The brief descriptions are below.  Feel free to email me or have students email me (mgrant2@memphis.edu) about either course.  The seminar in mobile teaching and learning is appropriate for Masters and doctoral students, while the IDT 8500 course is a doctoral-level course.

IDT 7078/8078: Mobile Teaching & Learning

This special topics seminar will be focused on the current landscape of mobile teaching and learning.  We’ll consider devices to support mobile teaching and learning, as well as the instructional strategies and apps that can support a mobile computing initiative.  Since this is a seminar, my plan is to offer a more open plan for course goals, so that you may investigate and spend time with a variety of topic of interest to you.

I plan to have a significant number of guest speakers from around the country via video conferencing highlight their programs and lessons learned.  This course will be completely online using synchronous conferencing technologies, so we will meet online Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30 to 8:30 pm.

Since a number of folks have asked, I also plan to have portions of this course open (the complete amount I’m not sure about just yet but at the minimum the guest speakers) for other folks, followers, and lurkers to participate in from around the globe. The course dates are June 4 – July 6, 2011.

IDT 8500: Evaluation & Synthesis of Research in IDT

This doctoral-level course will focus on academic writing.  We will work on the structure of scientific reports and how to write for academic audiences.  We will critique academic research findings and synthesize research findings into an original, coherent and structured document. This course will meet face-to-face and will have time allotted in the course schedule for students to read research and write syntheses of literature.  Of note, we will take a few class sessions “off” in order to allow you to read, review, reflect, and w-rite. Rest assured, there will be plenty of feedback throughout.  This course meets face to face on Mondays and Wednesdays, 5:30 to 8:30 pm. The course dates are June 4 – July 6, 2011.

Questions?

If you have questions about either of these course, I’d be happy to answer those. Feel free to email me. If you’d like to download the course flyer, click Summer 2011 Course Flyer.

Scanning QR codes at Union University

Hi, everyone! I just wanted to let you know about two graduate courses I will be teaching this summer.  Both are during the first summer term (June 4 – July 6, 2011).  The brief descriptions are below.  Feel free to email me about either course.

IDT 7078/8078: Mobile Teaching & Learning

This special topics seminar will be focused on the current landscape of mobile teaching and learning.  We’ll consider devices to support mobile teaching and learning, as well as the instructional strategies and apps that can support a mobile computing initiative.  Since this is a seminar, my plan is to offer a more open plan for course goals, so that you may investigate and spend time with a variety of topic of interest to you.  I plan to have a significant number of guest speakers from around the country via video conferencing highlight their programs and lessons learned.  This course will be completely online using synchronous conferencing technologies.  The course dates are June 4 – July 6, 2011.

IDT 8500: Evaluation & Synthesis of Research in IDT

This doctoral-level course will focus on academic writing.  We will work on the structure of scientific reports and how to write for academic audiences.  We will critique academic research findings and synthesize research findings into an original, coherent and structured document. This course will meet face-to-face and will have time allotted for students to read and write.  Their will be plenty of feedback.  The course dates are June 4 – July 6, 2011.

Questions?

If you have questions about either of these course, I’d be happy to answer those. Feel free to email me.

Slideshare iconSince I’ve been uploading quite a few presentations this semester from my Developing Interactive Learning Environments and project management course, I’ve also decided to upload a few others to Slideshare.net that I’ve given and created recently.  This is a little slow going, because I am attempting to be critical and meticulous to copyrights, as well as respectful of ideas and images, giving credit where appropriate.  I’m also systematically adding my Creative Commons licensing to each of the slide decks.

Last fall, I was invited to present to Dr. Sally Blake’s graduate student seminar about using technology to support your research.  So, I’m including those slides below.  These slides are organized into the phases of research:

  1. awareness of a field of endeavor
  2. literature searches and reviews
  3. citation management
  4. data collection
  5. data analysis
  6. dissemination

Just a sample of the technologies that are mentioned include journal table of contents updates, Delicious, diigo, LinkedIn, Mendeley, EndNote, RefWorks, SPSS, Google Docs Forms, SurveyMonkey, Nvivo, and Atlas.ti.  Here are the slides:

[slideshare id=3456284&doc=research-with-tech-100317094659-phpapp02]

Let me know if you have questions or suggestions for other technologies that I can include in the future, particularly ones that you use.

It’s getting to the time of the semester where I’m starting to get quite a few questions about what forms need to be completed, etc. for doctoral students in IDT.  (As an aside here, I’m going to point out that the word is doctoral not doctorial.  So that’s three syllables—not four.  Don’t add in the i.)  On my resource wiki, I have created a page that has a listing of all of the doctoral forms for IDT students.

If you are a student still taking courses, then you will only need the first two forms completed.  These are preferred to be completed within the first year of coursework.  However, they can be changed later to reflect actual courses taken.  Please note that there used to be three forms, but a new Program of Studies form has subsumed the Research Residency form.  So, now there is only two forms to complete.

Quick link: Forms for IDT Doctoral Students

Also, if you haven’t already, then I encourage you to poke around my resource wiki, where I have a number of resources for graduate students.

(Image by http://dryicons.com)

These are my Jumptags for July 22nd