Following up on my work with mobile learning and mobile computing devices, I’m proud to announce that I will have a new book chapter coming out soon. Here’s the title and abstract info.

Using Mobile Devices to Support Formal, Informal & Semi-formal Learning
Uses and Implications for Teaching & Learning

Abstract

Mobile devices are ubiquitous. They are often invisible to accomplish our everyday tasks and learning goals. This chapter explains how individuals learn using mobile devices during their daily lives—within K-12 schools, higher education, and outside of educational institutions altogether—with specific attention to STEAM disciplines. First, brief definitions of mobile devices and mobile learning are presented, then types of learning, i.e. formal, informal, and semi-formal, are discussed. Next, seven categories describe how mobile devices have been used for teaching and learning with examples as appropriate from STEAM disciplines: (a) increasing access to student information and campus resources, (b) increasing interaction with learning contents, (c) creating representations of knowledge, (d) augmenting face-to-face instruction, (e) supporting performance and decision-making, (f) enabling personalized learning, and (g) deploying instruction. Finally, five implications for employing mobile devices for teaching and learning are discussed.

Our chapter is part of a book titled, Full steam ahead: Emerging technologies for STEAM edited by Xun Ge, Mike Spector & Dirk Ifenthaler. If you would like to have a preprint copy of the chapter, just let me know.  It’s still in production right now.

Cengage Learning Computing Conference 2015

I’m proud to be presenting at the Cengage Learning Computing Conference in Phoenix, AZ, this week.  I have culled together a number of resources, recommendations, and best practices for designing and teaching blended, synchronous, and synchronous online courses, and so I’ve included those links below for the participants and my followers to have those all in one place.  I hope these are helpful, and I would really like to know if and how you use them. So please drop me a comment below or feel free to contact me on one of my social media streams.

Supporting Webpages & Resources Mentioned in the Slides

  1. Planning an Online Course
  2. Introductory Email to Online Students
  3. Introductory Pages for an Online Course
  4. Online Course Content Page Template
  5. Online Course Project Page Template
  6. Tips for Online Course Management
  7. Tips for Asynchronous Communications
  8. Tips for Synchronous Communications
  9. Assessment in Online Courses
  10. Building a Course Site with PBWorks

Presentation Slidedeck on Slideshare.net

 

Synchronous Class Meetings, In-Classroom & Flipped Classroom Slide Templates

It is no secret that I am a fan of iSpring’s tools (particularly the free one!).  I regularly use them in my online courses to produce narrated Powerpoints that convert to Flash for embed into my course web pages. I’m hoping to find the funds to upgrade to the iSpring version that will also let me output to HTML5 for mobile devices, too.  I was able to beta test this version, and I found it pretty useful and successful.

On iSpring’s blog, they have a quick post about QR codes, which you guys also know I’m a fan of, so I thought I would share.  Here’s a quick snippet from the post, but I encourage you to follow the link to see their ideas for using QR codes.

QR codes have been around for a while. What seems clearly interesting is that process of consolidation of complex QR code initiatives seems to be occurring. Clear call to action QR codes, linking to edge to edge formatted information on your cell phone is gaining traction.

via Is the QR code on point or just a phase? | iSpring Blog.

To follow up on iSpring’s question, I do think QR codes are a phase.  The US is kind of late to the game on QR codes, and I believe they will be replaced soon with technologies like RFID and near-field communication (NFC).  However, the ease in which QR codes can be created and scanned is pretty unparalleled right now, and I don’t know the RFID or NFC can be produced quite so easily by teachers and university faculty members.

What’s your thoughts? Please share them in the comments. I would love to hear what you have to say.
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: katiemarinascott via Compfight

teacher technology thursdays

Later today, I will be conducting a professional development workshop for teachers in our area and particularly those in the Shelby County Schools district. While I’ve been using QR codes for a while, the augmented reality apps I have only dabbled in.  So, I have spent quite a bit of time working through these to see what’s possible.

Earlier this summer while I was working with some teachers as part of a grant, I found out about the ColAR App, which is just fun.  I’ve also heard of the Aurasma app, but I spent a lot of time researching this to see what was possible, as well as what I could do.  I’m really pleased to see what I was able to come up with.

Here’s a brief description of the workshop and the slides I will be using:

Drop in for this fast-paced and hands-on workshop to see some of the most current and exciting technologies available for teachers and students. We’ll take look at QR codes (those square thingies on signs and posters) and augmented reality, which let’s you merge the real world with the digital one. In addition to learning how to do use these technologies, we’ll discuss how they can be leveraged for teaching and learning, too. Feel free to bring your own iPad or iPhone or I’ll have one for you to borrow.

[slideshare id=27280401&doc=you-gotta-see-this-forss-131017010438-phpapp02]

 

Image (cc) from Common Sense Media

In a course I’m teaching this fall for in-service teachers, I majorly upgraded the course content. One of the units is focused on digital citizenship and extends the content in a previous course that focuses on literacy, safety, and ethics. So, I thought I would share 10 of the best starting resources I found on the Web for teaching about and integrating elements of digital citizenship into curricula. These resources represent the most current thinking about digital citizenship and reflect the most recent revisions.

  1. Digital Citizenship: Nine Elements — Brief and quick explanation of all 9 elements of digital citizenship. At the bottom is one of my favorite organizations of these 9 grouped by respect, educate, and protect. Nice overview
  2. “Digital Citizenship Survival Kit” by Craig Badura — Make digital citizenship concrete to teachers and students with these everyday visuals.
  3. “How To Tackle Digital Citizenship During The First 5 Days Of School” by Holly Clark and Tanya Avrith — How to get started without being stressed out.
  4. Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship by Edutopia
  5. Digital Citizenship: Scope and Sequence — See what digital citizenship might look like across different grade levels. Get a sense of what is age appropriate and how a grade band, such as Grades 6-8, might plan across their school.
  6. “Keeping Students Cybersafe” by Anne Mirtschin
  7. “Copyright 101 for Educators” by Wesley Fryer — Understandable and appropriate for teachers. I like the emphasis on being a professional and what that means.
  8. 5 Lesson Ideas from Hoover High School P.A.S.S. — These are 5 everyday situations that students can respond to.
  9. “Chapter 5: Literacy in the Information Age” in Technology to teach literacy: A resource for K-8 teachers. — Shameless, gratuitous plug here: I wrote a chapter in this textbook that looks at media literacy and information literacy, as well as safety and ethics. So, I think it’s a great place to start if you trying to get a grasp on all of the pieces. (Psst. If you would like to see a review copy of the chapter, let me know. I will see what I can do for you.)
  10. “Digital Citizenship” from 21 Things 4 the 21st Century Educator — This is one “thing” inside by Macomb ISD, Ingham ISD, Shiawassee RESD, REMCAM‘s teacher professional development series. This one has some great resources collected together, including ones for bullying and a digital citizenship curriculum.

Bonus! Here’s #11!

Dr. Bill Taylor, a Professor of Political Science at Oakton Community College, wrote a letter to his students regarding academic integrity. I really like this approach about integrity the student-teacher relationship. I think this also feels more personal than speaking to the students (I’m not sure why, though.). Read the letter, and feel free to share your thoughts on Viral Notebook. I would really like to see some examples of this at the K-12 level. Do you know of any that are public?

What Can You Add?

Are there other great resources or ideas for digital citizenship that you can add? I would definitely love to see and share them with my students. Add them in the comments or tweet them out (@michaelmgrant) or Google+1 them out for us.

I wanted to let everyone know that I’m going to be presenting a new workshop for K-12 teachers coming up soon.  This workshop is going to be fun and hands-on.  We’re going to look at some exciting technologies, including augmented reality (AR) and quick response (QR) codes. Specifically, we’re going to look at how these technologies can be used with mobile devices, like smartphones and tablet computers, and I’m betting at least one or two of the things we’ll try will blow your mind.

The date and details are listed below:

You gotta see this!  Augmented reality & QR codes in action

Location // Room 320 Ball Hall, University of Memphis
Time & Date // 4:00 – 5:30 pm, Thursday (October 17, 2013)

Drop in for this fast-paced and hands-on workshop to see some of the most current and exciting technologies available for teachers and students. We’ll take look at QR codes (those square thingies on signs and posters) and augmented reality, which let’s you merge the real world with the digital one. In addition to learning how to do use these technologies, we’ll discuss how they can be leveraged for teaching and learning, too. Feel free to bring your own iPad or iPhone, or I’ll have an iPad for you to borrow.

The space for this workshop is limited, and the registration will open up on September 15th.  (I will send out some info when this goes “live.”)  If you have any questions, just let me know.  Use the comments below or email me.

Tips for teaching effectively screenshot

This morning I will be presenting to the UofM graduate teaching assistant (GTAs). I’ve had the pleasure of being asked to present to these folks for a number of years now, and it is an opportunity that I sincerely look forward to each fall. I really enjoy sharing my passions for teaching and learning with graduate students who will be working as TAs in higher ed — many of which will go on to become university faculty members. It’s a fun gig for sure, and I’m proud to be part of it.

Here’s a copy of the slidedeck that I will be using:
[slideshare id=5041303&doc=gta-workshop-2010-grant-100823155600-phpapp01]

And here is a link to my Resource Wiki, where more information can be found:
http://bit.ly/gtaworkshop

I’m excited to be visiting Georgia Regents University in Augusta, GA, over the next couple of days. I will be presenting some of my (and my students’) research on how teachers have initially been using mobile devices in their classrooms. This research was part of a course I taught with our doctoral students as an introduction to research. Collaboratively, we designed, conducted, analyzed, and reported the qualitative research.

I will also be presenting a workshop-py seminar on how to use QR codes with teaching and learning. You can view (and download) the slide deck at Slideshare.net.

20130207-110615.jpg

Our University of Memphis Instructional Design & Technology program has been attending the Mississippi Educational Computing Association conference this week in Jackson, MS, as a vendor to promote our program.  Plus, we are presenting a couple of sessions, too.

Freeways to mobile teaching & learning
In this hands-on session, we’ll take a look at Freeways for teaching and learning that are appropriate for a variety of mobile computing devices and platforms.
Check out the slidedeck in Slideshare

[slideshare id=10523927&doc=mstc-2011-mobile-workshop-for-ss-111208214231-phpapp02]

 

60+ Apps in 60 minutes or less
As current and former classroom teachers, we love to integrate technology into our classrooms. in this fast-paced session, we’ll share 60+ apps (!) that we have found to be helpful for teaching and learning.
Check out the slidedeck in Slideshare

[slideshare id=10508178&doc=60appsin60minutes-111208000146-phpapp02]

 

Midsouth Technology conference header

Today starts the Midsouth Technology Conference hosted by Memphis City Schools. I am proud to say that the UofM Instructional Design and Technology program faculty, students, and alumni are offering 14 presentations over the 2 days of the conference. This is up from last year .

You can see our schedule of presentations inside a Google Docs file at http://bit.ly/mstc2012

Also inside the schedule of presentations, we have linked up our slide decks and resources for the presentations.  We will continue to update this fill with links, so you can get access to them.