I wanted to give a quick shout-out to a doctoral student of mine, Dorian Brown.  She has been selected by our IDT faculty as the outstanding doctoral student for this year.  She will be presented with the award at our university’s annual honors assembly in April. If you happen to know Dorian, please give her a big round of applause!

Here’s the official announcement from Dr. Carmen Weaver:

Honors Assembly is an annual university event in which outstanding students from across the university are recognized for their accomplishments.  Each year, IDT honors one Master’s student and one doctoral student who have demonstrated an outstanding record in coursework, research, service, and the promotion of the IDT program.

This year’s recipients are doctoral student Dorian Brown and Master’s student Raina Burditt. The awards will be presented at Honors Assembly on Sunday, April 27, 2014. Please join us in congratulating these two remarkable students.

Thank you

I have awesome students.  It’s a simple truth.  I will admittedly get bogged down and discouraged along the road during a semester about what my students aren’t learning, aren’t accomplishing, or aren’t living up to, blah, blah, blah.  But there are times when I am poignantly reminded that my students are great and they are special and they are supportive of me and the work I do with their student colleagues.  (I know that sounds a little like the line from The Help: “You is good. You is kind…”) Yesterday was one of those times.

Last night as part of my capstone Masters project course, I invited a number of former students into our online class to offer up some perspectives and answer questions from the current students. Logan Caldwell, Dr. Joanne Gikas, Fair Josey, Jennifer Nelson, Dr. Suha Tamim, and Joey Weaver did an awesome job of sharing insights, experiences, and advice.  They highlighted the diversity in their experiences in the course, but there was also a real ‘shared experience.’ You could tell there was a camaraderie in their comments and how they related to one another.  I’m not sure if my current students picked up on it or not, but there was a tangible quality of we’ve-been-through-this-and-we-made-it-out-on-the-other-side-and-now-we-can-talk-about-it.

And I will admit that they did some things that I couldn’t do.  I could probably say the same things they did, but they wouldn’t mean as much. (In fact, I do think I say some of those same things.) But coming from these veterans, it has real street-cred.

So, a BIG THANK YOU to these folks.  You guys are awe-some!

And if you’re reading this and thinking, could I do that in one of my classes? I think you should try it.  Bringing back some former students and making time in class to have them offer some unique perspectives is a good thing to try.  Or if you’re already doing this, I’d love to hear more about it.  So, please share it in the comments.

AECT Research and Theory Division logo

I wanted to let everyone know (and please share this, too) that I will be hosting a short webinar for folks who are interested in finding out more about submitting a proposal to the Research & Theory Division of AECT.  This webinar is co-sponsored with the AECT Graduate Student Assembly!  The Research & Theory Division curates and promotes the most rigorous research throughout AECT, and we provide an outlet to discuss theory and research methodologies.

This short 30-minute presentation will focus on the four (4) proposal categories Research & Theory are considering as part of our call for proposals, and I will highlight some of the best advice for submitting a proposal.  I will also briefly discuss the new direction for featured research within AECT.  Opportunities to ask questions will certainly be included, and I will hang around for all of the questions.  Here are the details below.

Presenter:  Dr. Michael Grant, RTD Past President and Associate Professor in the Instructional Design & Technology program at the University of Memphis

Date/Time: January 30, 2014 at 1:30 P.M. (EDT)

Topic:  RTD Information Session—Submitting an AECT Conference Proposal to Research & Theory

Register: https://cc.readytalk.com/r/pqrqgeqjpe1f&eom

RTD Webinar Image

The Research & Theory Division of AECT is hosting our next professional development seminar.  Here are the details, and I hope you’ll plan to attend.

Scheduled on Feb 6, 2014 at 1:30pm (EST)

Invited speaker: Dr. Ryan Baker (http://www.columbia.edu/~rsb2162/)

Topic:  Learning Analytics – Potential and Principles

Abstract
Increasingly,  students’  educational  experiences  occur  in  the  context  of educational technology, creating opportunities to log student behavior in a fashion that is both longitudinal and very fine-grained. These data are now available to the broad education research community through large public data repositories such as the Pittsburgh  Science of Learning Center (cf. Koedinger  et  al,  2008). In this talk, I will discuss how the emerging Learning Analytics and Educational Data Mining communities are combining these data sources with data mining methods in order to scalably use this data to make basic discoveries about learners and learning. In this talk, I will both discuss learning analytics methods in general, and some of their key applications in studying and supporting learners.

I just wanted to follow up on a notice I posted a few weeks ago about nominations for the Distinguished Teaching Award at the University of Memphis. The deadline is approaching, and I wanted to be sure and make you aware that this is a great opportunity to recognize the outstanding teaching, mentoring, and course design implemented by our IDT faculty. I hope you’ll consider nominating someone.

Do you have a professor at the U of M who is an exceptional teacher? The Distinguished Teaching Award Committee is soliciting nominations for awards recognizing faculty who are outstanding educators. Honorees are recognized at the annual Faculty Convocation held at the end of the spring semester.

Students and alumni can nominate a professor for the 2014 Alumni Association Distinguished Teaching Award, which recognizes and encourages excellence in teaching.  Added weight will be given to faculty members who receive nominations from two or more sources (students, faculty, and alumni). A nominee’s total number of nominations may also be given added weight.

Students should use this link: http://www.memphis.edu/dta_student

Alumni should use this link:  http://umwa.memphis.edu/dta/alumninomination.php

Faculty can use this link: https://umwa.memphis.edu/dta/facultylogin.php

The nomination deadline is Friday, November 22, 2013. If you have questions please contact Dr. Melinda Jones, (901) 678-2690.

teacher technology thursdays

Later today, I will be conducting a professional development workshop for teachers in our area and particularly those in the Shelby County Schools district. While I’ve been using QR codes for a while, the augmented reality apps I have only dabbled in.  So, I have spent quite a bit of time working through these to see what’s possible.

Earlier this summer while I was working with some teachers as part of a grant, I found out about the ColAR App, which is just fun.  I’ve also heard of the Aurasma app, but I spent a lot of time researching this to see what was possible, as well as what I could do.  I’m really pleased to see what I was able to come up with.

Here’s a brief description of the workshop and the slides I will be using:

Drop in for this fast-paced and hands-on workshop to see some of the most current and exciting technologies available for teachers and students. We’ll take look at QR codes (those square thingies on signs and posters) and augmented reality, which let’s you merge the real world with the digital one. In addition to learning how to do use these technologies, we’ll discuss how they can be leveraged for teaching and learning, too. Feel free to bring your own iPad or iPhone or I’ll have one for you to borrow.

[slideshare id=27280401&doc=you-gotta-see-this-forss-131017010438-phpapp02]

 

Do you have a professor at the U of M who is an exceptional teacher? The Distinguished Teaching Award Committee is soliciting nominations for awards recognizing faculty who are outstanding educators. Honorees are recognized at the annual Faculty Convocation held at the end of the spring semester.

Students and alumni can nominate a professor for the 2014 Alumni Association Distinguished Teaching Award, which recognizes and encourages excellence in teaching.  Added weight will be given to faculty members who receive nominations from two or more sources (students, faculty, and alumni). A nominee’s total number of nominations may also be given added weight.

Students should use this link: http://www.memphis.edu/dta_student

Alumni should use this link:  http://umwa.memphis.edu/dta/alumninomination.php

The nomination deadline is Friday, November 22, 2013. If you have questions please contact Dr. Melinda Jones, (901) 678-2690.

AECT Research and Theory Division logo

As president of the Research and Theory Division (RTD) of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT), I wanted to let you know about an awesome opportunity to hear from an IDT god.  Dr. David Merrill is Professor Emeritus at Utah State University, and he is a renowned scholar, creating the First Principles for Instruction (here’s a link from Dr. Merrill’s site on the First Principles!).

Dr. Merrill will be presenting a brief webinar to launch our RTD Series of Professional Development.  It is sure to be provocative. Here’s the details and you do have to register beforehand.

Presenter:
Dr. David Merrill
Instructional Effectiveness Consultant & Professor Emeritus at Utah State University

Date/Time:
October 17, 2013 at 1:30 P.M. (EDT)

Registration Link:
https://cc.readytalk.com/r/wmg0r8xig6wl&eom

Topic:
My Hopes for the Future of Instructional Technology

Abstract:
This short paper presents reasons for three hopes for the future.  First, it is time to move the training of instructional designers to the undergraduate level.  Second, I hope that graduate programs in instructional technology will emphasize both the science of instruction — including theory development and research, and the technology of instruction– including using principles, models and theories derived from research as a foundation for designing instructional design tools that can be used to design instruction that is more effective, efficient and engaging. Third, it is time to restructure our master’s programs to prepare our students to manage designers-by-assignment (DBA) and to prepare them in designing instructional design tools that would enable DBA to produce more effective, efficient and engaging instructional materials.

This came across my email announcements, and I wanted to make sure and share it.  Dr. Lloyd Rieber is offering his free MOOC again on statistics. It starts on October 7, 2013.

I’ve heard a couple of folks talk about the first iteration of the course, and it’s been really well received.  As I mentioned in my previous post about Lloyd, he is an exceptional teacher. He is able to make complex topics concrete and understandable.  This would be an excellent refresher or a great introduction for someone a little apprehensive.  It’s free with very low risks to you.  You’ll like Dr. Rieber and how he teaches. 😉

Here’s the details:

I am again offering my MOOC on introductory uses of statistics in education.
This section will run from October 7-November 11, 2013 on Canvas.net
https://www.canvas.net/ .

Here’s a link to the course site:
https://www.canvas.net/courses/statistics-in-education-for-mere-mortals-1

The course is free.

I designed the course for “mere mortals,” meaning that I designed it for
people who want to know about and use statistics as but one important tool
in their work, but who are not — and don’t want to be — mathematicians or
statisticians. A special note that I also designed it with doctoral students
in mind, especially those who are about to take their first statistics
course. It could also be good for those students who just finished a
statistics course, but are still fuzzy on the details.

However, this course would be useful to anyone who wants a good, short,
hands-on, friendly introduction to the most fundamental ideas of statistics
in education.

Here’s my approach … I provide a short presentation or two on each
statistics topic, followed by a video tutorial where you build an Excel
spreadsheet from scratch to compute the statistic. Then, I ask you to take a
short quiz — consisting of sometimes just one question — where I ask you to
plug in some new data into your spreadsheet and then copy and paste one of
your new calculations as your answer. (And yes, there is also a short final
exam on the conceptual stuff.)

Examples of specific skills to be learned include the scales of measurement,
measures of central tendency, measures of variability, and the computation
of the following: mean, mode, and median, standard deviation, z (standard)
scores, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r),
correlated-samples t test (i.e. dependent t test), independent-samples t
test, and a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Lloyd

**********************************************
* Lloyd P. Rieber
* Director, Innovation in Teaching & Technology for
*   the College of Education
* Professor, Department of Career & Information
*   Studies
* 203 River’s Crossing
* The University of Georgia
* Athens, Georgia  30602-7144  USA
* Phone: 706-542-3986
* FAX: 706-542-4054
* Email: lrieber@uga.edu
*…………………………………….
* http://lrieber.coe.uga.edu/
* http://www.NowhereRoad.com
*

I just got this information today from a flyer in the hall of my building on campus (see crappy image to the right), so I wanted to get it out quickly to students.  The Chi Sigma Iota chapter from counseling psychology will be hosting an APA workshop, which is open to anyone.

Date:  Saturday, September 14
Time:  9:30 am to 12:00 noon/
Location:  209 Ball Hall on the UofM campus

This would be a really great opportunity for graduate students to take advantage of, particularly those in my Theories & Models class as well as any of my doctoral students.  Get the heads-up on APA 6th.