I just wanted to bring to your attention a doctoral-level course that all students in IDT and ICL should consider for the Spring 2013 semester.  IDT 8500 is referred to as “the writing class” by our students.  The course description says,

“Students will critique academic research findings and synthesize research findings into an original, coherent and structured document. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.”

This course is focused on (a) academic writing and (b) evaluating and synthesizing educational research.  The primary project in the course is a literature review.  However, I believe most students would say we do a lot more than just work on a review of related literature.  Doc students have questions about things, processes, how things work, what is considered good, etc.  We try to answer all of your questions along the way. 🙂  Above all, students are definitely better writers at the end.

IDT 8500 is appropriate for both beginning doctoral students and advanced doctoral students.  Students benefit from the course early on with research residency and later on prior to dissertation.  Some of the students’ comments about this class are:

Class should be offered more. There should also be a concerted effort to inform doctoral students about this course. It is TOO valuable for one to miss.

I am blessed to have been in this class and am better, professionally, for the experience.

This class was extremely helpful. I feel more competent and confident as a result of this course.

I hope you’ll consider registering for this course on Tuesday evenings in the Spring 2012 semester.

Together with Michael Barbour, we have a new book chapter that is coming out soon on mobile teaching and learning.  It was just accepted as final, so I’m glad to have this one complete.  This is part of a handbook on mobile learning edited by Zane Berge and Lin Muilenburg to be published by Routledge.  Our chapter is titled “Mobile Teaching and Learning in the Classroom and Online: Case Studies in K-12,” and I’ve included the abstract below.

In this chapter, we describe two projects to integrate mobile teaching and learning into K-12 schooling. First, we consider the rationale for increased use of mobile devices with today’s students, and we describe a professional development program to deploy iPads to classroom teachers. Next, we discuss the growth of K-12 online learning, and we describe a project for students enrolled in an online Advanced Placement course was delivered through a mobile learning content management system. Lastly, we discuss some of the lessons learned from these pilot projects and some of the promise and challenges of mobile teaching and learning.

This is connected to my on-going research, consulting, and teacher professional development on using mobile devices for teaching and learning.  Originally, we had included K-12 and higher education examples in this chapter, but the editors felt we should focus on one.  So, we pared this down to just K-12 and the work Michael has done with K-12 teachers and students, both in the classroom and online.  I hope to do a revision to this chapter in the near future as my mMIND project begins to collect data we hope to see some changes in math pedagogy and technology integration.

I hope you find this interesting and maybe a little helpful.  This chapter is much more practical and less research-y in nature.  Please let me know if you use it and if you find it helpful.

I just received the announcement and call for proposals for the Midsouth Technology Conference.  It will be December 6-7, 2012, this year and at the Cook Convention Center downtown.  The “Call To Present” will be on the Memphis City Schools website soon (this is the site but it still has the 2011 info), and they would like for you to sign up and register to present at the conference. Once again Memphis City School teachers who present will be provided with a substitute for both days if needed.

As I did last year, I am planning to attend and bring a large number of student presenters with me.  I will again put up a Google Docs document to share with everybody and we can work out what presentations we would like to submit.  Let me know if you would like to be part of the group!

The West Tennessee Technology Symposium is currently accepting proposals for their one-day event.  The information and link to propose is below.  This is an informal event and would be a great setting to sharing some practical tips.  In addition, Dr. Robbie Melton will be keynoting.  I’m thinking about going.  If you would like to go and possibly present, let me know.

When: October 24, 2012
Where: University Boling Center, Watkins Auditorium

ABOUT
The West Tennessee Technology Symposium is West Tennessee’s premier conference on technology in education.  WTTS features speakers from around the region on a variety of topics, all centered around the theme of technology in education.

FEATURED KEYNOTE
Dr. Robbie Kendall-Melton is the Associate Vice Chancellor for eLearning and Mobilization for the Tennessee Board of Regents, as well as a full tenured professor at Tennessee State University. Dr. Melton formally served for ten years as the administrator responsible for the development and operation of the Tennessee Board of Regents system-wide Regents Online Campus Collaborative: RODP and ROCE and eight years as Associate Dean of Education: The University of Tennessee at Martin.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
We are looking for sessions on any technology topic that would relate to education.  To submit a speaking proposal, click here.  Submissions will be evaluated and chosen based on how well the proposal fits the general theme of technology in education. Speakers will be notified of their proposal status by October 1, 2012.

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION
We hope you’ll make plans to attend. For conference registration and additional information visit http://www.utm.edu/wtts.

I’m excited to report that one of our (Jongpil Cheon and mine) articles that’s been in press for a while has recently been published.  This is part of Jongpil’s dissertation research and went through quite a few iterations with the journal prior to its acceptance.  This work certainly offers some important contributions to interface design and cognitive load.  I’d love to hear what you think.

Cheon, J.P. & Grant, M.M. (2012). The effects of metaphorical interface on germane cognitive load in web-based instruction. Educational Technology Research & Development, 60(3), 399 – 420

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a metaphorical interface on germane cognitive load in Web-based instruction. Based on cognitive load theory, germane cognitive load is a cognitive investment for schema construction and automation. A new instrument developed in a previous study was used to measure students’ mental activities of schema construction and automation supported by structural cues in a metaphorical interface environment. Eighty participants were randomly assigned to one of two types of instructional units with the same instructional content and different interface types (i.e., non-metaphorical interface and metaphorical interface). The results indicated that germane cognitive load positively affected learning performance while there was no relationship between germane cognitive load and students’ prior knowledge. A metaphorical interface enhanced learners’ germane cognitive load and learning performance, and both germane cognitive load and prior knowledge similarly contributed to learning performance. The findings provide implications for the advancement of cognitive load theory and the practice of instructional development.

via Educational Technology Research and Development, Volume 60, Number 3 – SpringerLink.

This is abstract from Brandi Leonard’s dissertation research:

Students in developmental writing courses and first-year composition courses struggle with the writing process. Individual instructional strategies have been insufficient to engage these students or build their self-confidences for further writing courses. The purpose of this study was to understand how students perceive a combination of three strategies, social networking, the writing process, and cooperative learning may help students to be successful with the prewriting phase of the writing process. The three research questions were (1) what are students’ perceptions of a social networking tool; (2) how do students perceive a social networking tool influences prewriting in cooperative groups; and (3) how do cooperative groups work together to prewrite? A combination of strategies together with a high level of student engagement may help to increase student success in developmental writing and first-year composition courses.

Nine students across four sections of writing courses agreed to participate in this qualitative inquiry. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews, social networking posts, observations, and a researcher-made handout, and data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Three themes emerged: Students perceived usefulness related to using a social netowrking tool, their behaviors, and positive results. Group interaction refleceted students’ positive interdependnece, individual accountability, group processing, social skills, and face-to-face interaction. Finally, knowledge representation was evident as it encapsulated the participants’ views on making their thinking visible and sharing ideas.

A discussion of the research questions integrated these findings. Students perceived a social networking tool to be valuable, beneficial to helping them learn, and an achive for their ideas. Students perceived a social networking tool to influence prewriting in cooperative groups by generating ideas, representing their contributions, and communications with group members. Finally, the participants’ perceptions and observations revealed that working together in cooperative groups to prewrite reflected the five elements of cooperation. Implications for practice with writing instructions, limitations of the current study, and implications for further research about timeframes, participants, and challenges are provided.

via University of Memphis ETD System.

The completed dissertation research file (in PDF) can be downloaded from the University of Memphis Electronic Theses and Dissertations system.

This is Suha Tamim’s dissertation research

The purpose of this study was to explore how health education professionals create ehealth and mhealth education interventions. Three research questions led this qualitative study. The first research question focused on the use of learning theories, instructional models, and instructional design models. The second research question focused on the use of elearning and mlearning design principles. The third research question focused on the use of health behavior theories and models. Twelve health professionals selected for their involvement in the creation of ehealth and mhealth education interventions participated in this study.

The themes emerging from the research questions showed a variability in how the participants used education theories and models, principles of elearning and mlearning design, and health behavior and health education theories and models to create ehealth and mhealth interventions. On education theories and models, the participants used elements of instructional design (i.e., analysis, design, evaluation) but did not use any specific instructional design model. Moreover, they invested efforts in creating instructional strategies that reflected instructional models of different learning theories but did not specify particular models or theories. Four themes emerged on the instructional strategies they used in the interventions: (1) connections to behaviorist approaches to learning, (2) connections to cognitivist approaches to learning, (3) connections to constructivist approaches to learning, and (4) unspecified learning theories. On the use of elearning design principles, seven patterns emerged: (1) interaction, (2) learner control, (3) provision of help, (4) use of multimedia, (5) engagement, (6) user friendliness, and (7) visual appeal. On the use of health behavior theories and models, three themes emerged (1) no use of health behavior theory or model, (2) use of a mix of health behavior theories or models, and (3) use of a particular health behavior theory or model.

The variability of the findings and the resulting themes suggested implications for practice and further research. These implications concern all health professionals creating ehealth and mhealth interventions as well as scholars in the field of instructional design and health education and heath behavior. The implications and limitations of the study were also discussed.

via University of Memphis ETD System.

The complete dissertation research file (in PDF) can be downloaded from the University of Memphis Electronic Theses and Dissertations system.

I wanted to let everyone know that I will be participating in the Institute for Intelligent Systems “Speed Date” program this Friday.  I was invited to present about the research and projects I am currently working on, so I plan to talk about

Here’s the info for the Speed Date.  I hope you’ll plan to attend:

2nd Speed Date of the Institute for Intelligent Systems
Friday May 4, 4PM-5PM in the Methodist Theater of the FedEx Institute of Technology (ground floor)

Confirmed speakers include Bonny Banerjee (IIS / Electrical & Computer Engineering), Eugene Buder (Communication Science and Disorders), Usef Faghihi and Xiangen Hu (Psychology), Michael Grant (Instructional Design and Technology), Chip Morrison (Center for Research in Educational Policy), Phil Pavlik (IIS / Psychology), Deb Tollefsen (Philosophy)

and

2012 Student Poster Session of the Institute for Intelligent Systems Student Organization (IISSO)
Friday May 4, 5PM-7PM in the Fogelman Center

(drinks and hors d’oeuvres served)

—-

The IIS speed date is an excellent opportunity to learn about the interdisciplinary research at the Institute for Intelligent Systems at the University of Memphis. In one hour you will get a flavor of the various research projects that IIS affiliates are currently involved in. The purpose of the speed date is just that: a matchmaking research opportunity.

The IISSO student poster session will provide another outstanding overview of the interdisciplinary research conducted in the IIS. Students from departments as diverse as Psychology, Computer Science, Engineering, Philosophy, Physics, Education, English, and Communication Science and Disorders will display their research on posters.

If you have questions, please do not hesitate to contact Renee Cogar (hcogar@memphis.edu).

AECT Research and Theory Division logo

I would like to encourage you to read through the slate of awards that the Research and Theory Division of AECT will be hosting this year.  Overall, the awards receive few submissions.  So, if you feel that you fit one of the categories, I would highly recommend you submit for one of the awards.  This is great recognition for you and your university’s program.  The deadline for most of the awards is June 1st, 2012.  However, check the individual awards and contact Zeni Colorado with the email at the bottom for more info.


Dean and Sybil McClusky Research Award

This award is presented to honor the most outstanding doctoral research proposal in educational technology, as selected by a jury of researchers from the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT). For more information, go to http://bit.ly/yv42II.

Outstanding Service Award

This award recognizes outstanding service and commitment to the Research and Theory Division.  Awardees are nominated by the Research and Theory Board and recognized at the Awards Luncheon at the annual convention.

Outstanding Research and Theory Division-Sponsored Accepted Proposal

This award is given annually to honor a Research and Theory Division-sponsored convention proposal that demonstrates quality research and contributes to the educational communications and technology field.  All accepted Research and Theory sponsored concurrent proposal presentations will be considered. The recipient will be recognized at the Awards Luncheon at the annual convention.  Awardees are nominated by the Research and Theory Division Convention Planner and confirmed by the board.

Research and Theory Division Outstanding Journal Article Award

An outstanding published article that demonstrates rigor in research on an important aspect of the educational communications and technology field.  Articles nominated must have been published in the last three years in a regularly published journal relevant to our field, and should be relevant to the broad field of instructional design. Additionally, articles nominated should bring insights to either empirical research or theory development in instructional design. Anyone may submit a nomination; however, To be eligible for the award, a nominee must be a member AECT in good standing at the time of nomination.  For more information, go to http://bit.ly/ybnJAI.

Research and Theory Division Outstanding Book Award

The Research and Theory Division established this award for the best book-length publication in educational communications and technology. To be considered for the Award, a book must be concerned with the field of educational communication and technology through research or scholarly inquiry, must have a research base, and must have a copyright date of the past two years in the year in which the award is to be given.  To be eligible for the award, a nominee must be a member AECT in good standing at the time of nomination.  For more information, go to http://bit.ly/zlulZ8.

All calls for applications or nominations will be posted at the following sites:

All inquiries and applications for these awards should be submitted by email to Zeni Colorado at jcolorad@emporia.edu.

 

The Research and Theory Division is now accepting nominations for the following awards:

Dean and Sybil McClusky Research Award

This award is presented to honor the most outstanding doctoral research proposal in educational technology, as selected by a jury of researchers from the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT). For more information, go to http://bit.ly/yv42II.

Research and Theory Division Outstanding Journal Article Award

An outstanding published article that demonstrates rigor in research on an important aspect of the educational communications and technology field. Articles nominated must have been published in the last three years in a regularly published journal relevant to our field, and should be relevant to the broad field of instructional design. Additionally, articles nominated should bring insights to either empirical research or theory development in instructional design. Anyone may submit a nomination; however, to be eligible for the award, a nominee must be a member AECT in good standing at the time of nomination. For more information, go to http://bit.ly/ybnJAI.

Research and Theory Division Outstanding Book Award

The Research and Theory Division established this award for the best book-length publication in educational communications and technology. To be considered for the Award, a book must be concerned with the field of educational communication and technology through research or scholarly inquiry, must have a research base, and must have a copyright date of the past two years in the year in which the award is to be given. To be eligible for the award, a nominee must be a member AECT in good standing at the time of nomination. For more information, go to http://bit.ly/zlulZ8.

The Deadline for all award nominations is June 1, 2012. All inquiries should be directed to Research and Theory Division Past-President, Zeni Colorado at jcolorad@emporia.edu.

via AECT R & T Division.